What A Hard Winter With Snow Means For Shed Hunters?

 

A big buck with antlers after a snowCompared to last year’s extremely mild winter with several days of above average temperatures and hardly any snow in West Central Illinois, so far, this year has been a little different. Several days of below freezing temperatures, and several days of temperatures struggling to even hit double digits, along with accumulative snowfall, will set the stage for a “better” shed hunting year.

The biggest advantage to having a hard winter for shed hunting purposes is that the sheds will be more concentrated. When the weather is milder and little snow accumulation, whitetails in general will have more food sources available to them and will spread out over a greater area making it harder to pinpoint there sheds.

Shed Hunting in the Snow

When the winters get tough and snow is on the ground for an extended period of time, whitetails conserve as much energy as they can and do not travel far from a quality food winter food source. Grains such as corn or soybeans and brassica food plots are usually preferred during this time of year to other food sources. Deer will target grain that is exposed above the snow level. Standing crops of soybeans or corn is a shed hunters dream during winter’s of deep snow. Here’s a few tips on where to look and what to bring when shed hunting in the snow..deer in the deep snow bedding

  • Food Source- One positive thing about shed hunting in the snow is the deer can’t hide their tracks! Finding what the deer are feeding on is easily identifiable in the snow and once you find the food, your in business! If you are not in an area with a lot of agriculture, focus on areas with a high concentration of woody browse and early successional growth. Deer will browse heavily on green briar, honeysuckle, blackberry and raspberry bushes when other plants and food sources like acorns are buried under the snow. If your in an area without a quality late season food source and is made up of mostly hardwood timber. Focus on southern exposures and areas that have a high concentration of woody browse.
  • Bedding Area- The second best place to look for sheds after finding a primary food source is their bedding areas. As noted earlier, deer will not travel far if they have a quality food source and sufficient bedding near by. There will usually be 2 or 3 primary trails leading to the preferred bedding area to the main food source in the area.  I like to check each trail in and out of the bedding area before grid searching the heart of the bedding. Whitetails will use clumps of cedars and other evergreens this time of year for thermal cover and protection from the wind. Overgrown creek ditches, swamps, and clear cuts are all areas deer will concentrate in with heavy snowfall.
  •  Shed hunting in the snow is physically demanding and means burning a lot of calories. Make sure to bring water and a snack if you plan on hiking for an extended period of time.
  • Boots- Rubber boots or waterproof hiking boots with gaiters to keep your feet dry are a must for shed hunting in the snow.
  • Sun Glasses- The sun can be blinding when it reflects off the snow. You’ll want to make sure you have a pair in your pack. This is one thing I always seem to forget!
  • Walking Stick- Not only will it help you fend off the Snow Yeti, it’ll help keep you on your feet when traversing rolling terrain.
  • Binoculars- These will save precious steps when you can’t tell whether or not that stick is an antler across the ravine!Shed Hunting in the snow

We have several bucks with one side missing and some that have already shed both sides on trail camera. After this short warm spell this week the extended forecast shows temperatures dropping back down below freezing again. If your shed hunting areas has a high concentration of woody browse and a quality food source, this winter expect to stack up the antlers!

For more tips and tactics on shed hunting check out our shed hunting blogs-  Finding Match Sets, 7 Quick Tips For Finding More Antlers, Main Shed Hunting Page, Late Season Shed Hunting.

HuntingManager@HeartlandLodge.com

Zach Jumps

Last Updated: February 28th, 2019

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